Online Programme – Archive

 

For the second time, we will be running a parallel online programme during the eAssessment Scotland conference. And once again, we are proud to announce that we will be partnering with Transforming Assessment (TA) for this venture onto the live digital stage.

Transforming Assessment logo
The TA website has played host to a series of webinars since 2010, showcasing eAssessment developments from around the world. the site also contains a wealth of resources and examples of how technology can be used to enhance the assessment experience.

We look forward to a fruitful partnership with the TA team and would strongly recommend visiting their site and signing up for the series of webinars that take place throughout the year.

It’s going to be an ambitious endeavour with 2 keynote presentations and 18 seminars/workshops spread over 2 weeks. You will have the chance to hear from speakers from across the globe – talking about everything from national e-Assessment initiatives to assessing students in virtual worlds (with an opportunity to experience this for yourself).

Details of the programme will appear in July; sessions will last 30-45 minutes (or around an hour for TA presentations), with time set aside for discussion towards the end. As with the rest of the conference, all of the presentations are FREE to join.

Register for Online Conference



All times listed below are UK-based (GMT +1)


Tuesday, 20th August

08:00 (60 minutes)
eMarking Workflows in a University Setting
Courtenay Harris, Connie Price and Helen Flavell, Curtin University

11:00 (45 minutes)
Mastery, Benchmarking and MOOCs: Can the Learning Dog Wag the Assessment Tail?
Roy Williams, University of Portsmouth

14:00 (30 minutes)
Technology-enhanced Assessment and Feedback: From Challenge to Change
Lisa Gray, JISC



Wednesday, 21st August

08:00 (60 minutes)
Assessment-as-learning: Introducing the Conversation Sim
Robert Nelson and Phill Dawson, Monash University

14:00 (30 minutes)
CAGD – An In-house Developed eLearning System: What It Is, How It Was Made, and Where It’s Going
Graham Hibbert, Leeds Metropolitan University

20:00 (60 minutes)
Radio EDUtalk
John Johnston and David Noble, Radio EDUtalk with Cristina Costa, University of Strathclyde



Thursday, 22nd August

08:00 (60 minutes)
Issues and Challenges with Assessment in Stand-Alone Moodle
Helen Farley, Tas Bedford and Gary Orth, University of Southern Queensland; Malcolm Wake, Southern Queensland Correctional Centre

11:00 (30 minutes)
Did They Like It? Did They Learn It? Are They Doing It? How Can You Assess Informal Learning?
John Kleeman, Questionmark

14:00 (30 minutes)
Making Assessment Count (MAC) and Feedback+
Gunter Saunders, University of Westminster



Tuesday, 27th August

08:00 (60 minutes)
Using Narratives to Assess Free Exploration in 3D Spaces
Torsten Reiners and Lincoln Wood, Curtin University; Sue Gregory, University of New England; Hanna Teräs, University of Wollongong

10:00 (30 minutes)
Inclusive Assessment – From Aspiration to Daily Practice
Alistair McNaught, JISC TechDis
Link to join live ‘Inclusive Assessment’ presentation at 10:00

Keynote Presentation 13:00 (30 minutes)
How Do You Assess a Community of Learning? The Case of DS106
Jim Groom, Martha Burtis and Alan Levine, University of Mary Washington
Link to join live ‘DS106′ keynote at 13:00

14:00 (30 minutes)
Exams Online: First Answer or Best Answer?
Angela Dunsire, University of Dundee
Link to join live ‘Exams Online’ presentation at 14:00



Wednesday, 28th August

08:00 (60 minutes)
Assessing Algebra Concepts: The Potentials and Limitations of Online Delivery
Robyn Pierce, University of Melbourne

11:00 (30 minutes)
Sharing Formative Tutor-, Peer- and Self-feedback Openly: A Crazy Idea? An Example from Academic Development
Chrissi Nerantzi and Juliette Wilson, University of Salford
Link to join live ‘Open Feedback’ presentation at 11:00

14:00 (30 minutes)
Sharing the Assessment Process and Sharing a Service: Experiences of Peer Assessment Using WebPA and How LTI Enabled Institutions to Pilot WebPA as a Shared Service
Dr Sara Preston, University of Aberdeen and Simon Booth, University of Stirling
Link to join live ‘WebPA & LTI’ presentation at 14:00

20:00 (60 minutes)
Radio EDUtalk
David Noble and John Johnston, Radio EDUtalk with Catherine Cronin, National University of Ireland
Link to join live Radio EduTalk show at 20:00



Thursday, 29th August



Friday, 30th August

08:00 (60 minutes)
Learning Analytics: A Bottom-up Approach to Enhancing and Evaluating Students’ Online Learning
Josie Fisher, Fredy-Roberto Valenzuela and Sue Whale, University of New England

Keynote Presentation 09:30 (30 minutes)
Questions, Answers and Rewards: Motivating Student-driven Assessment Online
Paul Denny, University of Auckland
Link to join live ‘Questions, Answers and Rewards’ keynote at 09:30




Session Desciptions




Keynotes


Jim Groom, Martha Burtis and Alan LevineHow Do You Assess a Community of Learning? The Case of DS106
Jim Groom, Martha Burtis and Alan Levine, University of Mary Washington
Tuesday 27th, 13:00-13:30

This presentation will frame the challenges and possibilities of assessing an open, online community course, using the example of the digital storytelling course ds106.

We will focus on how we approach assessment in an open, online course, and define the strategies we use to frame a community around the desire to share and learn rather than the often fruitless pursuit of a grade.

The idea of qualitatively assessing thousands of people in a course is absurd, but the idea of using thousands of people to better help you assess 25-30 students is nothing short of brilliant ;)



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Paul DennyQuestions, Answers and Rewards: Motivating Student-driven Assessment Online
Paul Denny, University of Auckland
Friday 30th, 09:30-10:00

When students create, share and moderate their own learning resources, they participate in the assessment process in a variety of roles. Evaluation of the quality and relevance of contributed items, generation of peer feedback, and use of the resources for practice and learning brings in elements of both peer and self assessment.

A growing number of technologies that support student-generated learning resources now exist, and instructors use a variety of approaches for encouarging students to participate. One such example is PeerWise, a tool students use to author, share, discuss and answer multiple-choice questions. This talk will briefly describe PeerWise and give examples of the kind of automated and peer-generated feedback that is produced. The effectiveness of using game-like elements and mechanics to motivate student participation will also be reported.


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Presentations


Transforming Assessment PresentationeMarking Workflows in a University Setting
Courtenay Harris, Connie Price and Helen Flavell, Curtin University
Tuesday 20th, 08:00-09:00

The use of technology in higher education now impacts on almost every aspect of academic work and the pace of technological change is accelerating. While most academics are now familiar with tools for teaching (learning management systems, lecture capture, discussion boards) most assessment practices continue to rely on traditional, paper-based methods. However, even this is changing as assessment technologies and tools improve with much debate around whether the advantages outweigh the disadvantages.

This webinar will explore the opportunities and challenges created by having to assess student work in a large compulsory unit with approximately 2,000 students and 35 markers using electronic marking workflows, and how the learning from this experience has influenced strategy at the institutional level. The webinar will also describe an Office for Learning and Teaching funded research project which aims to support academic staff to be agile and responsive to ever-expanding technological developments by designing and trialing a professional development program to improve their agility and resilience. Preliminary results from the research into the impact of the professional development on staff and their ability to be technologically agile will be presented.


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Roy WilliamsMastery, Benchmarking and MOOCs: Can the Learning Dog Wag the Assessment Tail?
Roy Williams, University of Portsmouth
Tuesday 20th, 11:00-11:45

The first year mathematics students at Portsmouth in 2010 and 2011 behaved strangely. The majority of them spent far more time in examinations than was required. The 2012 cohort reverted to type, and did only the necessary. The first two cohorts were put in charge of their own benchmarking and mastery; the third cohort just sat an end of year exam. e-Assessment, particularly in quantitative disciplines, provides unique affordances to put students in charge of their own summative assessment, as a derivative of learning, not an ‘examination’ of learning.

MOOCs provide a range of additional affordances for foregrounding learning, and putting the learner in charge, rather than traditional formative assessment or an examination (both of which are optional). This can just be the separation of teaching and learning from assessment, with the prospect of separate (often commercial) institutions providing ‘assessment as a [remote] service’. But the challenge is to do far more, and take learners’ motivation and engagement in benchmarking their own mastery seriously, and make assessment more flexible and responsive.


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Lisa GrayTechnology-enhanced Assessment and Feedback: From Challenge to Change
Lisa Gray, JISC
Tuesday 20th, 14:00-14:30

As we know, assessment and feedback are at the heart of the student experience, and are at the same time form a significant part of practitioners’ workload. Evidence shows that they are also a matter of concerns for institutions, with student surveys consistently report lower levels of learner satisfaction in this area. The Jisc Assessment and Feedback programme has worked with over 30 institutions to explore in more detail their assessment challenges, and to pilot technology-enhanced practices, process and policies that better meet the needs of learners, employers, staff and institutions.

Drawing on the lessons learnt from the experiences of these projects, this presentation will discuss the challenges facing the sector, highlight examples of where those issues are being addressed through technology-enhanced practices, and discuss models of change that can offer an insight into managing the complexity of the process.



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Transforming Assessment PresentationAssessment-as-learning: Introducing the Conversation Sim
Robert Nelson and Phill Dawson, Monash University
Wednesday 21st, 08:00-09:00

Our session tells the story of the conversation sim. We wanted to teach unwieldy, sprawling syllabus to hundreds of people whom we might never see; but we also wanted to assess if the students follow our ideas. Our model was the Socratic humanities tutorial, where a teacher asks a question and someone answers—partially and with bias—in a way that calls for further responses.

We replicate this structure on the computer which simultaneously conducts assessment, because participation in the simulated conversation clocks up credit on a judiciously discriminating basis.


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Graham HibbertCAGD – An In-house Developed eLearning System: What It Is, How It Was Made, and Where It’s Going
Graham Hibbert, Leeds Metropolitan University
Wednesday 21st, 14:00-14:30

CAGD is an e-portfolio/e-learning/e-assessment system that has been developed by the School of Art, Architecture and Design at Leeds Metropolitan University over the last nine years. What started off as a small project for feedback within one undergraduate course, has grown to become a sophisticated system that acts as the digital hub for the whole School.

Now firmly established, it is starting to expand into the rest of the Faculty of Arts Environment and Technology, and to external Institutions – both nationally and internationally. This presentation will tell the story of its development, what it currently does, and what its developers are working towards.


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John Johnston, David Noble and Cristina CostaRadio EDUtalk
John Johnston and David Noble, Radio EDUtalk with Cristina Costa, University of Strathclyde
Wednesday 21st, 20:00-21:00

Radio EDUtalk is a weekly live online broadcast organised by David Noble, Acting Head of Education in a residential school in Fife, and John Johnston, an ICT support officer in central Scotland. Since 2009, the EDUtalk project has enabled educationists to create, record and share educational audio. Over seven hundred audio contributions have been posted on the EDUtalk website.

Radio EDUtalk was launched towards the end of 2011. Shows have featured phone-ins, policy discussions between panelists contributing via telephone, and audio-only presentations by experts within various fields of education. Live or pre-recorded shows air each Wednesday evening.

Radio EDUtalk is a free education and professional learning resource. There are no production costs, no charge to listeners, and no payments made to guests. All broadcasts are made available online under a Creative Commons license. Typically, Radio EDUtalk recordings are accessed or downloaded around two hundred times within a couple of weeks of broadcast. The show has many subscribers and over four hundred followers on Twitter.


Special Guest

This first show’s special guest is Cristina Costa, a Lecturer in Lifelong Learning (TEL) at the University of Strathclyde. She was named Learning Technologist of the Year 2010 by the Association for Learning Technology (ALT). Since 2011, she has also been a Visiting Research Fellow at the Manchester Metropolitan University, where she collaborates with Professor Carol Haigh in applying and researching the use of Social Media in Health Care contexts.

Her research focuses on the use of participatory media in a changing environment. She is particularly interested in analysing the advantages and also the implications of using the social web in Education and beyond (Learning and Teaching, Research and Internationalisation, Engagement and Social Enterprise, etc). She was a keynote speaker at eAssessment Scotland 2012.


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Transforming Assessment PresentationIssues and Challenges with Assessment in Stand-Alone Moodle
Helen Farley, Tas Bedford and Gary Orth, University of Southern Queensland; Malcolm Wake, Southern Queensland Correctional Centre
Thursday 22nd, 08:00-09:00

Institutions are increasingly relying on digital technologies that require internet access to support learning and teaching, particularly from a distance. As these technologies are adopted, certain groups become excluded from participation, specifically those cohorts without access to reliable internet.

The ‘From Access to Success’ project will develop and deploy a sustainable and innovative learning management system (LMS) called Stand-Alone Moodle (SAM) that is internet-independent. In the first instance, SAM is being deployed in correctional centres where incarcerated students are not able to access the internet. This session will explore the issues and challenges surrounding assessment associated with this project.


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John KleemanDid They Like It? Did They Learn It? Are They Doing It? How Can You Assess Informal Learning?
John Kleeman, Questionmark
Thursday 22nd, 11:00-11:30

Online learning content and activities are rapidly expanding beyond the boundaries and reach of the traditional ‘walled gardens’ of VLEs and course management systems. There is increased understanding both in the workplace and in higher education that we learn not just from formal sessions but also by interacting with peers and learning by experience. Online learning now includes a wide array of formats – everything from online video, to blog posts, to portal-based document repositories and wikis – which can be accessed via an even wider spectrum of platforms, including tablets, smartphones and other touch/multi-touch devices.

But how do you know that students are learning and improving performance? How do you know “they get it?” And how do you know specifically which activities and content are impacting learning and comprehension?

This session will explore the implications that “informal learning” holds for the measurement of knowledge, skills and abilities. It will look at the issues, needs and opportunities for e-assessment to play critical role in the successful deployments of informal learning initiatives and technologies. Specific examples and applications will be explored, including the use of embedding of e-assessment in portals, blogs and wikis, the use of mobile and tablet assessments; and the role of observational assessment in giving useful insight on the impact of learning activities.

Finally, the session will introduce how the new “Experience API”, the next generation of the SCORM standard, will allow instructors to capture and analyse “activity streams” from informal and formal learning. This API can be used to recognize and track many different types of learning activities and content – everything from simulations and serious games to online courses and experiential learning. Assessments – surveys, quizzes, tests and exams – can also generate activity feeds. These learning activity feeds can be captured in a data warehouse called a “Learning Records Store”, from which you can filter and analyse learning activities and results.


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Gunter SaundersMaking Assessment Count (MAC) and Feedback+
Gunter Saunders, University of Westminster
Thursday 22nd, 14:00-14:30
Link to join live presentation at 14:00

The Making Assessment Count project was funded by the JISC at the University of Westminster (2008-2010). This project led to the development of the MAC process for action on feedback. Subsequently the original project team have worked with 5 other universities, on 2 benefits realisation projects also funded by the JISC, to establish the extent to which the MAC process can be applied across institutional contexts and different subject areas.

Integral to the MAC process is the use of self-review questionnaires that generate feedback reports with a degree of personalisation to the individual concerned. The teams across the universities have used a variety of systems to deliver the questionnaires and the most recently developed of these, designed for scalability and ease of integration with institutional virtual learning environments, is called Feedback+.

In this presentation, the principles of the MAC process and how a tool like Feedback+ works within that process will be outlined. In addition the ways in which the different institutions have adapted the original MAC process devised at Westminster, to suit their specific needs, will be examined. Finally the presentation will show how the different implementations of MAC are underpinned by sound and accepted principles for effective assessment and feedback and will present the results of evaluations from across the institutions that collectively demonstrate how MAC can enhance assessment and feedback.

This work was supported by the Joint Information Systems Committee and the University of Westminster.


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Transforming Assessment PresentationUsing Narratives to Assess Free Exploration in 3D Spaces
Torsten Reiners and Lincoln Wood, Curtin University; Sue Gregory, University of New England; Hanna Teräs, University of Wollongong
Tuesday 27th, 08:00-09:00

Throughout educational settings there are a range of open-focused learning activities along with those that are much more closed and well-organised. The plethora of opportunities creates a confusing melee of opportunities for lecturers as they attempt to create activities that will engage and motivate learners.

In this session, we demonstrate a learner-centric narrative virtual learning space, where the unrestricted exploration is combined with mechanisms to monitor the student and provide indirect guidance through elements in the learning space.

The instructional designer defines the scope of the story in which the teacher and learner create narratives (a sequence of actions and milestones to complete a given task), which can be compared, assessed, and awarded with badges and scores. The model is described using an example from Logistics; where incoming orders have to be fulfilled by finding the good and delivering it to a given location in a warehouse. Preliminary studies showed that the model is able to engage the learner, create an intrinsic motivation and therewith curiosity to drive the self-paced learning.


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Alistair McNaughtInclusive Assessment – From Aspiration to Daily Practice
Alistair McNaught, TechDis
Tuesday 27th, 10:00-10:30

According to John Hattie’s research, assessment is one of the factors with the biggest influence on achievement. There are two reasons for this:

  1. the learner finds out what they don’t know and
  2. the tutor finds out what they didn’t communicate properly.

The more tutors can embed inclusive assessment in daily practice the more effective teaching and learning can be. This session is in two parts – the first looks at ways to embed assessment and feedback into daily practice in ways that minimise barriers for people with access needs. The second part looks at formal assessment and the ongoing work with awarding bodies to ensure assessment is fair and accessible to all irrespective of disability.


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Angela DunsireExams Online: First Answer or Best Answer?
Angela Dunsire, University of Dundee
Tuesday 27th, 14:00-14:30

Today, for most of us, it would seem strange to sit and write for 3 hours, being so used to typing. So why would we expect students to sit and write a 2 or 3 hour essay-based or extended question type of exam? Would it not seem more appropriate to allow them to type their answers? Would this not make the marking of the exam easier?

Certainly it can be easier for the student as well, if they can easily edit their answers to produce their best, considered responses rather than their first responses. But what if the student isn’t used to typing, isn’t as comfortable with the use of word techniques, doesn’t have English as a first language? How easy is it then for the student to type their answers?

We review some of the challenges and benefits relating to the use of the Intelligent Assessment system ExamOnline, and look at some of the ways we can help students prepare for the exam, as well as help provide them with some valuable skills for entering the workplace.


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Transforming Assessment PresentationAssessing Algebra Concepts: The Potentials and Limitations of Online Delivery
Robyn Pierce, University of Melbourne
Wednesday 28th, 08:00-09:00

This session will report some preliminary findings of our current OLT grant project on students’ understanding of algebra. This seed project will pilot an online diagnostic assessment system to investigate students’ conceptual understanding of algebra and will support educators’ attempts to identify and correct key misconceptions across first year subjects in mathematical sciences.

A description of the preliminary online maths survey will be presented as well as the concept of Specific Mathematical Assessments that Reveal Thinking (SMART tests) at the core of our online diagnostic system.


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Chrissi Nerantzi and Juliette WilsonSharing Formative Tutor-, Peer- and Self-feedback Openly: A Crazy Idea? An Example from Academic Development
Chrissi Nerantzi (left) and Juliette Wilson (right), University of Salford
Wednesday 28th, 11:00-11:30

During this online workshop we would like to discuss openly shared feedback in the context of Academic Development and specifically within the Postgraduate Certificate in Academic Practice (PGCAP). This programme is offered at the University of Salford to academics and other professionals who teach or support learning. The PGCAP tutor team actively experiments and models innovative teaching approaches to enable our students, who are teachers in Higher Education, to experience these as a learner and provide opportunities for reflection on their own practice and action.

We use social media portfolios owned by students to capture the process and product of learning, assessment and feedback. We will focus on the openly shared tutor, peer feedback and self-feedback practices currently applied linked to the core module Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (LTHE). We will describe how it was used with a specific cohort of students in Semester 2 during the academic year 2012/13. What is the relationship between feedback transparency, openness and trust among students and tutors? How are they interconnected and what effect do these factors have on peer and tutor relationships, motivation, assessment and learning? Does openly shared feedback using social media portfolios enable wider learning conversations and in what ways? We share with delegates our preliminary evaluation of the openly shared feedback approach, benefits and challenges for students and tutors, as well as ideas and recommendations for further refinement of the this process to maximise engagement with feedback, learning and development.

Our explorations are relevant to Teacher Educators as well as others teaching in a variety of educational settings who are keen to explore alternative feedback practices.


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Sara Preston and Simon BoothSharing the Assessment Process and Sharing a Service: Experiences of Peer Assessment Using WebPA and How LTI Enabled Institutions to Pilot WebPA as a Shared Service
Dr Sara Preston, University of Aberdeen and Simon Booth, University of Stirling
Wednesday 28th, 14:00-11:30

Assessing group work has always been challenging and not well supported by virtual learning environments (VLEs). If a peer assessment tool exists in a VLE, it tends to be focused on enabling students to assess other students’ work, not their contribution to group work. One available solution is WebPA, an application developed by Loughborough University and the University of Hull. However, piloting new learning applications, such as WebPA, is challenging for institutions with limited resources.

The IMS Learning Tool Interoperability (LTI) specification changes how institutions can share technologies such as WebPA. An outcome from the JISC-funded ceLTIc project was an LTI connector for WebPA. This enables institutions with VLEs which support LTI, such as Blackboard and Moodle, to connect to a single instance of WebPA and thus share a single instance of the application. The JISC Embedding Benefits programme extended the ceLTIc project to evaluate the feasibility of institutions using LTI to share services such as WebPA.

This presentation will outline the experiences of the University of Aberdeen, one of the universities to benefit from the availability of WebPA as a shared service, and the opportunities and challenges of establishing and delivering shared services of this nature. In particular, the use of WebPA in the assessment of group work will be examined from the perspective of academic staff, learners, learning technologists and service managers. Pedagogical considerations will be discussed as well as the challenges associated with building a local peer assessment community. Finally, the role played by LTI in enabling multiple institutions to access niche technologies, such as WebPA, as a shared service will be highlighted.

Further information:



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John Johnston, David Noble and Catherine CroninRadio EDUtalk
John Johnston and David Noble, Radio EDUtalk with Catherine Cronin, National University of Ireland
Wednesday 28th, 20:00-21:00

Radio EDUtalk is a weekly live online broadcast organised by David Noble, Acting Head of Education in a residential school in Fife, and John Johnston, an ICT support officer in central Scotland. Since 2009, the EDUtalk project has enabled educationists to create, record and share educational audio. Over seven hundred audio contributions have been posted on the EDUtalk website.

Radio EDUtalk was launched towards the end of 2011. Shows have featured phone-ins, policy discussions between panelists contributing via telephone, and audio-only presentations by experts within various fields of education. Live or pre-recorded shows air each Wednesday evening.

Radio EDUtalk is a free education and professional learning resource. There are no production costs, no charge to listeners, and no payments made to guests. All broadcasts are made available online under a Creative Commons license. Typically, Radio EDUtalk recordings are accessed or downloaded around two hundred times within a couple of weeks of broadcast. The show has many subscribers and over four hundred followers on Twitter.


Special Guest

The second show’s special guest is Catherine Cronin – one of the keynotes at this year’s Day Conference. Catherine’s work focuses on online and open education, digital literacies and social media in education. Her current research interests are open education practices and digital identities.

In addition to her work in HE, Catherine works with schools and youth groups to explore e-safety and social media for learning. Catherine is a New Yorker living in Galway; has degrees engineering and women’s studies; has taught in community settings, the Open University and HE in Ireland and Scotland; and is a passionate advocate for the power of social media to connect us and to transform learning.



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Shane SutherlandBeyond Me-portfolios: Embedding Personal Learning Tools in the Assessable Curriculum
Shane Sutherland, PebblePad
Thursday 29th, 11:00-11:30

ePortfolios might more readily be described as Me-portfolios as they are most often seen, and advanced, as a means of promoting personal and/or promotional information about their owner. When used in this context, many and varied tools may be drawn upon to present a digital persona of the individual in question.

However, as ‘eportfolio systems’ have evolved so too has the pedagogical understanding of their wider affordances, resulting in many more instances of task-portfolios appearing in the curriculum. Task, or t-portfolios, are typically used to surface either a process of learning or to document learning and experience over time. T-portfolios can be sub-divided into a number of sub-categories including: Process, Project, Placement, Production and Pedagogical.

As t-portfolios are normally developed as the result of a curriculum demand it follows that they need to be assessed and credentialed. Through the lens of some real-life examples, this presentation will discuss the specific feedback and assessment needs of task-portfolios.


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Steve TuckerThe Use of QuestionMark to Deliver “Decision-driven” Learning
Dr Steven J Tucker, University of Aberdeen
Thursday 29th, 13:00-13:30

In the life sciences, there is an increasingly limited capacity to engage students in laboratory exercises. This is primarily due to increasing class sizes and limitations in the timetable. Most practical classes are procedural in nature, with a strong decision making element woven through. These decisions at key points in the protocol influence the outcome and provide directed stages for assessment and feedback within a safe and non-costly environment.

Through the use of the online assessment tool, QuestionMark, experimental procedures can be represented as a series of steps, instructions and questions with consequences. By delivering feedback at each step, the student learns experiential details of the procedure through their choices and the individual decisions made influence the outcome of the experiment. Through incorporating loops within the assessment structure the student actually gains pseudo practical experience. The specific example developed and for discussion here is the Western blotting protocol; a very commonly used practical technique within the life sciences. For various reasons, running this as a real practical class is not feasible. However, this simulated online tool equips students with working experience and understanding of the protocol in a safe, cost free environment, where learning and experience is enriched in a risk free, decision driven way.

Furthermore this could be adapted for use in any decision driven context within the institution e.g. in Physical Sciences, or procedural areas of Arts and Social sciences. The proposed talk will cover aspects of design, feedback, use of QuestionMark and assessment of success.


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Transforming Assessment PresentationLearning Analytics: A Bottom-up Approach to Enhancing and Evaluating Students’ Online Learning
Josie Fisher, Fredy-Roberto Valenzuela and Sue Whale, University of New England
Friday 30th, 08:00-09:00

In this session, we will provide an overview of our OLT-funded project aimed at enhancing students’ online learning experience. We will describe the series of interventions we implemented throughout the teaching period just ended and present preliminary findings on the efficacy of these interventions.


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